Blog

Jack-o’-lantern of the week: A 12-inch (30 cm) helium balloon goes up to space, then returns to earth, then goes up again, and so on

Posted by admin

In case you missed it: On Friday, Taha and his friend Taha Muthiah were watching the eclipse from their home in South Africa when the balloon they had been holding in the air suddenly exploded.

A local newspaper in South East Cape Town posted the story on Facebook.

Taha said that the balloon was supposed to go up to about 3,500 metres (11,000 feet) above the ground and that the helium in it caused the balloon to explode.

The balloon was released to earth at around 7:40 p.m. local time.

“The balloon went up and then we heard a big bang, which was followed by an explosion,” Taha told CBC’s The Early Edition.

“And then we saw it go down.

Taha is now in the United States and said he was in a hotel in Boston when he received the news. “

It’s really scary.”

Taha is now in the United States and said he was in a hotel in Boston when he received the news.

“I was in shock.

I thought, ‘Oh my God, what happened?'” he said.

Tessa said that she has heard of people who have witnessed the balloon’s demise.

The balloon, called Taha’s Balloon, was launched from a Taha Helicopter factory in Cape Town. “

So, I’m glad that I’m not going to be around to see that happen.”

The balloon, called Taha’s Balloon, was launched from a Taha Helicopter factory in Cape Town.

The company is based in the city’s central business district.

Taahe said that while the balloon has been used for filming in Africa and the Middle East, the balloon can also be used to create solar power.

“If you have a solar panel in the sky, then you can create some electricity,” Taahen said.

“But when you put a balloon on a solar power station, the electricity is actually generated in the balloon.”

The helium balloon will be returned to the factory and recycled.